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  NARVA 1700
 
  Swedish order of battle
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  KLISZOW 1702
 
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  FRAUSTADT 1706
 
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  Russian corps 1704-06
 
 
  LESNAYA 1708
 
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  POLTAVA 1709
 
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  HELSINGBORG 1710
 
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  GADEBUSCH 1712
 
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  STRESOW 1715
 
 
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  Coalition army
 

Örjan Martinsson

Battle of Fraustadt

The battle of Fraustadt (February 1706) was next to the battle of Narva the greatest Swedish victory in the Great Northern War. A Swedish army of 10 000 men commanded by Carl Gustaf Rehnsköld attacked and almost annihilated a two times larger Saxon-Russian army near Poland's western border. The Swedish war effort in Poland was before the battle seemingly close to a complete collapse because the Swedish main army led by Charles XII had their hands full in the east. But thanks to Rehnsköld's victory at Fraustadt and Charles XII's encirclement of the Russian main army in Grodno the campaign instead ended in a complete Swedish triumph. Before the year was over Saxony would sue for peace and accept Stanislaw Leszczynski as Polish king. The Swedish army could thereafter direct all its effort on defeating the last remaining enemy, Russia.

The battle itself, which according to the Swedish calendar happened 3 February, but according the Gregorian calendar (used by the Saxons) 13 February and according to the Julian calendar (used by the Russians) 2 February, have often been called a Swedish variant of Hannibal's pincer movement in the battle of Cannae 216 BC. But the battle was actually planned by Rehnsköld as a frontal attack in which the Swedish numerical inferiority would be countered by thrusting through the enemy line with cold steel weapons before the enemies superior fire power could make an impact. Circumstances in the battle resulted however in the cavalry wings moving around obstacles and attacking the Saxon's flanks in classic Hannibal style. In any way the battle ended with a total victory for the Swedish army. Over 7 000 Saxons and Russians were killed and just as many were captured. The Swedes only lost 400 men.

The map above show the positions of the two armies just when the battle started. The map is taken from the book "Fraustadt 1706 - Ett fält färgat rött" (2008) with permission from its author Oskar Sjöström.