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Örjan Martinsson

Danish Infantry Uniforms 1700-1730

  1691
Coat Lining
1 Livgarden til Fot Yellow Red
2 Grenadier Corps Raised 1701
3 Dronningen Red Yellow
4 Prince Christian (Frederik 1691) Grey Dark red
5 Prince Georg Grey Orange
6 Prince Carl (Christian 1691) Grey Yellow
7 Sjællandske Grey Blue
8 Jyske Grey Ordinary red
9 Fynske Grey Green
10 Schack's Grey Feuille morte
  Kurlandske Grey Violet
11 Marine Regiment Grey White
12 Oldenborgske Grey Muscus
13 Württemberg-Oels (Raised 1701) National Militia Raised 1701
14 First Danish (Raised 1703)
15 Second Danish (Raised 1703)
16 Third Danish (Raised 1703) Ålborgske East Sjællandske
17 Fourth Danish (Raised 1703) Århusiske West Sjællandske
18 Hansen's (Raised 1710) Riberske Fynske
19 Baartig's (Raised 1712) Oldenborgske (1704) Viborg-Lolland

The table above show the Danish infantry regiments' uniform colours according to the royal regulation from 1691. These can give clues to how the Danish uniforms looked like during the first decade of the 18th century. At that time the Danish army mainly wore light grey coats with a distinctive regimental colour on the lining and facings. A new regulation from 24 October 1711 decreed that the Danish army henceforth should wear red coats. The regiments which were rented to the Maritime powers were however not included in this regulation and it was not until the revised 1716 regulation that the entire Danish army received instructions for their red uniforms.

The presentation of the Danish infantry uniforms on this page is mainly based on Karsten Skjold Petersen's book "Den danske hærs uniformer i 1700-tallet" from 2005 (images with black captions have been taken and translated from his book). But I have also added additional information from Lars-Eric Höglund's book "Stora nordiska kriget 1700-1721 - del 2" from 2003 and the articles by Torstein Snorrason and Daniel Schorr which were previously published on the now defunct website www.northernwars.com (still accessible in the Internet Archive). I have made an effort to try to piece together the sometimes conflicting information from these authors. It is especially on the design of the striped cuffs from the 1710s that the writers disagree with each others, and I have on a separate page presented what Daniel Schorr wrote on this subject. Even more conflicting information can be found in the booklets about the Danish army written by C. A. Sapherson (1997) and Anthony Moore (1999). Those two have I however largely ignored since they appear to be based on Otto Vaupel's book "Den Danish-norske hærs historie" from 1872 which already in the 19th century was widely criticised for its numerous errors.

In the beginning of this period the vest and leg clothing (breeches and stockings) were usually in the same colour as the facings and lining. But according to Schorr and Höglund were these items red in all regiments from 1711. Karsten Skjold Petersen claims however that this did not happen until 1716 and that the vest and leg clothing before that were in the regimental colour. Although it occurred in the battle of Gadebusch that the soldiers' stockings were covered by red gaiters made of red canvas.

Some details are hard to find information on. The hats are for example on this page usually laced with white, but there are no regiment that explicitly had that colour and in reality the colour variation could have been great. The hat lace may have been in the regimental colour (early in the period?) or in the button colour (later in the period?). If the regiment had "yellow" brass buttons it is thus likely that the hats were edged with yellow lace, and if it had "white" buttons of silver or pewter it may have had white lace. The hat also hade cockade which in the beginning of the period was in the regimental colour but later became black.

The colour on the collar is usually not reported separately (Karsten Skjold Petersen lumps them together with the cuffs) and it is therefore not easy to determine whether the regiments had collars on their coats. I have made the assumption that the uniforms were collarless during the first decade of the 18th century but had collars afterwards. However during the period 1735-1747 Danish coats were yet again without collars.

The uniforms of each regiment are described below. Each description begins with a chronology that contains the uniform information from Karsten Skjold Petersen's book. It is then followed by complementary information from Snorrason, Schorr and Höglund (the latter's book also include a primary source: The postmaster in Malmö's spy report from December 1709).

Livgarden til Fot
(Foot Guards)

M. L. Wedell
T. Weinigel
K. G. Malzahn
K. A. Danckwardt
J. B. Eichstädt
W. A. Schack-Wittenau
H. J. Arnoldt

1701
1702
1708
1709
1710
1711
1716

1700-1713 Paille-yellow (straw) coat with red facings and lining. Cloak (cassock) red with paille-yellow facings and lining. White buttons on the coat and yellow on the cloak. Red leg clothing and vest. The officers had from 1708 ponceau red coats with paille-yellow facings.
1713-1716 Red coat with paille-yellow facings and lining as well as white buttons and buttonholes. Leg clothing and vest in paille-yellow. Cuffs and collar edged with silver.
1716-1750 Same as above but with red leg clothing.

The Postmaster in Malmö stated in his spy report from December 1709 that the uniforms of the Guard consisted of  "red coats and cloaks with yellow facings and collars". If this is true then the Guard should have received their red m/1711 uniforms several years earlier than  1713 as Karsten Skjold Petersen writes. But also Torstein Snorrason question the accuracy of the postmaster's report. It is possible that the postmaster was misled by the red cloak.

According to Daniel Schorr the regulations from 1711 and 1716 decreed that the Guard's "white" buttons were to be covered with silver. He also claims that the cuffs should be of the A type, i.e. without silver edge and embroidered buttonholes. Skjold Petersen is also alone in mentioning that the collar had a silver edge 1713-1773 even though the drawing to the right  (which is taken from his book) shows a collar without silver edge from 1728.

Furthermore the drawing appear to show that the guardsmen had hats with gold lace in 1728. It is therefore possible that they also had gold lace during the Great Northern War.
 
Private belonging to Livgarden til fot 1728. The buttonholes were embroidered with white thread. All soldiers still had a mustasch, later that became in the infantry exclusive for grenadiers. Worgewitz 1728. Tøjhusmuseet.

Grenadier Corps
("Grenaderkorpset" in Danish)

V. Eichstädt
A. Gaffron
K. F. Staffeldt

1701
1710
1717

1701-1716 Red coat and light blue (bleumerant) facings with silver edge and white buttons and buttonholes. Lining, vest and leg clothing also light blue.
1716-1750 Same as above but with red leg clothing.

Schorr states that the regulations from 1711 and 1716 decreed that the Grenadier Corps was supposed to have silver-plated ("white") buttons and cuffs of the A type, i.e. without silver edge and embroidered buttonholes.

The uniform which was issued in 1709 has been described in the sources and was very expensive with wide silver lace around the buttonholes, silver edged bandoliers of yellow velvet and gilded grenadier caps. The grenadier caps had gilded metal plates already when the corps was created in 1701, but in 1728 they were completely made of embroidered cloth.

Note that the model drawing below to the right shows a uniform with dark blue facings instead of light blue. The written sources are however very clear when they state that the Grenadier Corps had light blue facings. According to Karsten Skjold Petersen this kind of inconsistence between written sources and pictures are common and he explains it by saying that the colours on the pictures may have degraded and got darker with time, or that the artist may have worked in badly lit rooms and thus failed to see the proper colours of the models.


Grenadier from the Grenadier Corps at the funeral procession of Christian V's  half brother Christian Gyldenløve in 1703. Engraving by Andreas Reinhard c. 1707. Published with obituary and eulogy by Hector Gottfried Masius and Jobs Trellund in 1709.


Uniform of a private in the Grenadier Corps 1735. As something new "klapper" were introduced on the cuffs. The Livgarde and Grenadier Corps had five buttons on these instead of four as in the regular infantry regiments. Model drawing.  Rigsarkivet, kgl resolution nr. 125/1735

Dronningen's Livregiment
(Queen's Life Regiment)

J. D. Haxthausen
E. Wedell
M. Due
G. W. Sponeck
A. Lühe

1698
1702
1708
1710
1716

1700-1702 Red coat with yellow lining and facings (officers had scarlet coats).
?-1711 Yellow coat with yellow lining and facings.
1712-1765 Red coat with yellow lining and facings.
1716-1735 Vest and leg clothing in red.

The only information Karsten Skjold Petersen has on the button colour is that it was yellow 1705 (i. e. brass). According to Daniel Schorr the regulation from 1711 and 1716 decreed that Dronningen's Livregiment should have pewter buttons.

In 1702 the officers should have a scarlet coat, white stockings, white feathers on the hat and a white sash around the waist. The grenadier caps were at the same time made of yellow plush, but with a front plate of black velvet and silver embroidery with the regimental name in the middle ("Königin" or "Dronningen"). Apart from the coat the soldiers also had a red cassock with facings and collar of yellow plush.

Grenadier caps of the mitre type are also mentioned in a contemporary description from 1705 of the battalion which was sent to Austria. The cap was described during a troop parade as being of red plush with a yellow shield and on the back the regimental name (“Dronningen") embroidered in silver”. The spelling ought to have been in Danish because the Holy Roman Empress asked the Danish ambassador what the word meant. It was on this occasion the regiment was reported to have had brass buttons.

According to the spy report from postmaster in Malmö had Dronningen's Livregiment in December 1709 the same uniform colours as the Guard (i. e. red coats with yellow facings).

The regiment is described to have been dressed in red, blue and grey uniforms at Gadebusch 1712. There were then coats that had been repaired with 40 patches of different colours. The state of the uniforms were so bad that the regiment had been forced to take uniforms from one battalion and let it remain in quarters, in order to equip the other battalion so that it could participate in the battle.

Uniform of a private in Dronningen's Livregiment 1735. The pocket flaps on the private's uniforms were only a decoration. Collar on the coat was introduced first in 1747. Model drawing. Rigsarkivet, kgl resolution nr. 125/1735.

Prince Christian's Regiment

P. Kragh
L. Boiseth
F. K. Bielke
J. D. Lattorf
R. Biegen
J. K. Rewentlow

1690
1703
1706
1708
1710
1719

1700-1712 Light grey coat with red facings ("iron grey" 1702, "white-grey" 1710).
1712-1716 Red coat with yellow buttons as well as black lining, collar and cuffs (black leg clothing?).
1716-1721 Red coat with white buttons and light blue buttonholes, light blue lining, light blue cuffs and collar with a black stripe as well as red vest and red leg clothing.
1722-1735 Same as above but with a light blue vest.

The cuffs on the large image furthest to the right have the same appearance as in the plate from 1716 which is depicted in Karsten Skjold Petersen's book. Both Skjold Petersen and Lars-Eric Höglund have however written descriptions that would suggest that the cuffs only had one black stripe. Daniel Schorr has on the other hand clearly described two black stripes on the facings, but in a different order than in the plate (see the small image).

According to Snorrason the stockings were red in 1702, i. e. in the present regimental colour which further defined as dark red. Cloaks/cassocks in the same colour as the coat are mentioned 1702 and 1709. The officers were 1702 reported to have had the same colour as the privates on their coats except for the lining, as well as wearing a red sash. The grenadiers had at the same time caps made completely of fur. Although in Austria (1705?) they are mentioned to have had grenadier caps of cloth with the regimental name embroidered on the back.

Prince Georg's Regiment
(disbanded 1721)

K. V. Repsdorff
D. Plessen
H. Scholten
K. Eichstädt

1698
1705
1715
1716

1700-1704 Blue coat with orange/dark yellow facings and lining.
1705-1711 Uniform completely unknown but the coat is red from 1711.
1717-1721 Red coat with white buttons and aurora lining as well as cuffs and collar in aurora with a blue stripe. Vest and leg clothing red.

According to Snorrason the regiment was supposed to have grey coats in 1691 but according to Skjold Peterson they had blue coats 1700-1704. Facings and lining were however always orange.

The cuffs on the later uniform should according to Schorr have had a different appearance (small image to the right) then what Skjold Petersen, Höglund and the plate from 1716 states (large image to the right).

Furthermore Snorrason mention that many uniform descriptions incorrectly say that the regiment's coats were green. This is the result of a publisher's misreading of the handwriting of the 19th century historian Otto Vaupell, in which he read steel green instead of steel grey.

Prince Carl's Regiment

K. Bielke
J. Scholten
J. B. Schwärtzel
P. Rönneberg
H. J. Schack

1692
1702
1704
1709
1717

1700-1704 Blue coat.
1704 Red facings and red lining.
1704-1716 Uniform unknown except the red coat that was introduced 1712.
1716-1722 Red coat with white buttons, light blue lining as well as light blue cuffs and collar with a orange stripe. Vest and leg clothing red.
1722-1735 Red coat with yellow buttons and buttonholes, yellow lining as well as yellow cuffs and collar with a light blue stripe. Light blue vest and red leg clothing.

According to Snorrason this regiment should have had grey coats with yellow lining in 1691 but Skjold Peterson give it completely different colours for the period 1700-1704. And just like the preceding regiments Schorr give the cuffs a different appearance in 1716 (small image) than what Skjold Petersen, Höglund and the plate from 1716 say (large image).

Snorrason also mentions a source (Vrigny) who wrote that the newly raised dragoon regiment Württemberg-Oels had grey coats with yellow facings in 1702, but thinks that the source is actually describing Prince Carl's regiment which was deployed in the same area. This is because the enlistment patent of the dragoon regiments prescribes blue coats with red facings. Skjold Peterson has on the other hand assumed that Vrigny got the right name. This means that two uniforms and two regiments have been combined in a completely different way by Snorrason and Skjold Petersen.

Sjællandske Regiment
(Zealand Regiment)

G. K. Puttkammer
L. De Boiset
D. E. Zepelin

1696
1706
1714

1704 Blue coat with facings and lining in white.
1708-1730 Yellow buttons.
1712-1716 Red coat with facings, lining and leg clothing in feuille morte.
1716-1723 Same as above but with red vest and leg clothing.
1724-1735 Red coat with yellow lining and white buttonholes. Cuffs and collar yellow with a white stripe. Red vest and leg clothing.

Snorrason states that Sjællandske Regiment had light grey coats with dark blue lining during the 1690s. He also mention a decision from 1707 that they furthermore should have brass buttons and blue wool for the buttonholes as well as blue breeches and stockings. This suggests that the uniform colours of the 1690s were still used the following decade even though Skjold Petersen does not mention anything about grey coats

Jyske Regiment
(Jutland Regiment)

H. F. Boyneburg
T. Weinegel
L. Blücher
J. P. Ingenhoven
H. H. Scheel

1695
1701
1702
1710
1717

1700-1713 Light grey coat with red lining and facings.
1713-1766 Red coat with lining, facings and buttonholes in white.
1715-1766 White buttons.
1716-1735 Leg clothing and vest red.

Schorr states that the regulations from 1711 and 1716 determined that the regiment should have brass buttons, i. e. yellow and not white buttons.

Snorrason refers to Vrigny who in 1702 wrote that the Jutlanders were completely dressed in white with red and the same colours for the overcoat as well as red stockings and a black neckcloth. The hat was laced with red and white wool, and had a cockade with the same colours.

That the Jutlanders had an overcoat/cloak with the same colours as the coat is also confirmed in the spy report from the Malmö postmaster in December 1709.

Fynske Regiment
(Fynen Regiment)

H. H. Erffa
H. K. Schönfeldt
A. Eynden
J. Friis
O. Callenberg
H. Scholten

1699
1702
1704
1713
1716
1716

1700-1712 Light grey coat with green lining and facings. White buttons 1702 and yellow 1712-35.
1700-1702  Green vest for the privates and Grey-white vest for the officers.
1702-1716 Green leg clothing.
1713-1766 Red coat with green lining and facings.
1716-1721 Leg clothing and vest red.
1728-1735 Dark green cuffs, collar, buttonholes, lining and vest. Red leg clothing.

Apart from the information above Vrigny wrote in 1702 that the regiment's hats had a yellow braid (gold lace for the officers) and a green and white cockade. The coat also had red collar (which could possibly be a mistake and actually be a reference to a neckcloth). They also had Grey-white cloaks with green lining, which is confirmed by the postmaster in Malmö 1709 who also mentions green collars.

The plate from 1716 has depicted Fynske Regiment's cuffs with a light green colour and perhaps that was the shade they had all the time. I have however chosen not to portray the regiment in the images above with a light green shade because another regiment with light green cuffs in the 1716 plate is reported to have had dark green facings in 1728. Furthermore, other regiments which explicitly were supposed to have light blue facings have been depicted with dark blue on the plate.

H. Schack's regiment
J. B. Schwängeln's regiment
Prince of Hessen's regiment
D. E. Zepelin's regiment
 1688
 1701
 1704
 1710

This regiment which was disbanded 1714 is oddly enough not included in Karsten Skjold Petersen's book.

The only information from Torstein Snorrason is the regulation from 1691 according to which the regiment should have light grey coats with lining in feuille morte. Schorr mentions the regulations from 1711 and 1716 which calls for red coats with facings and lining in feuille morte (Lars-Eric Höglund also mentions that collar should be in feuille morte).

According to the postmaster in Malmö the regiment had in December 1709 white coats and coats with brown-yellow facings and collars.

Marine Regiment
("Marineregimentet" in Danish)

L. Hohndorff
A. A. Gaffron
A. Andichou
P. Scavonius

1699
1708
1710
1719

1709 Grey coat with orange facings.
1710 Red coat with lemon yellow facings.
1710-1767 Red coat with yellow buttons 1712-1716 and white buttons 1728-1767.
1715-1716 Steel grey facings and lining
1716- (before 1722) Facings and lining in aurora
1716-1735 Red leg clothing and red vest.
1722 Green facings.
1728-1762 Light green cuffs, collar and lining. White buttonholes.

The Marine Regiment does not appear to have had any stabile uniform colour. According to Snorrason the coats were grey with white lining 1691-95 and thereafter completely grey. In 1707 a decision was made that they in the future should have grey-white coats with blue lining, facings, collars, breeches and stockings. But according to Skjold Petersen the regiment had orange facings in 1709 and in December that year the postmaster in Malmö reported that they had red coats and cloaks with lemon yellow facings and collars. The facings colour was then steel grey in 1715 and aurora in 1716. Höglund mentions that the coats of m/1711 and 1716 had collars.

Oldenborgske regementet

E. Wedell
Fredrik Wilhelm av Sønderborg
H. Ph. Praetorius
F. A. Wedel-Jarlsberg

1693
1701
1711
1719

1712-1764 Red coat with yellow buttons.
1712-1716
Light green facings with a white stripe (light green leg clothing?).
1716-1722 Light green lining, light green facings with a stripe in aurora.
1716-1735 Red vest and leg clothing.
1722 Green facings with two orange stripes.
1728-1735 Cuffs and collar dark green with a yellow stripe. Yellow buttonholes and dark green lining

According to the regulations from 1691 the Oldenborgske Regiment should have had grey coats with lining in "muscus". Höglund writes: "Light grey coat with blue?".

1st Danish Regiment

K. Gyldenløwe
A. F. Trampe
A. Harboe
F. Ahlefeldt
E. Wedell
K. A. Lepel
J. S. Birkholtz
K. Staffeldt
L. Reichwein
A. A. Praetorius

1703
1703
1705
1706
1708
1709
1710
1712
1717
1717

1700-1712 Light grey coat (blue lining, collar and cuffs 1709).
1712-1730 Red coat with light blue lining, light blue facings with two white stripes and light blue collar with a white stripe as well as light blue buttonholes.
1716-1750 Red leg clothing and at least until 1721 a red vest.
1728-1735 Yellow buttons and light blue vest.

The regiment was created in 1703 by merging one battalion each from Dronningen's and Prince Georg's regiments as well as a third of a battalion from the Marine Regiment.

I have followed the instructions from Daniel Schorr regarding the cuffs in the images to the right, even though Karsten Skjold Petersen notes that the cuffs had two white stripes. Höglund and the plate from 1716 seem to support Schorr.

The 19th century historian Otto Vaupell specified the regimental colour as light blue and states that the regiment was not allowed to participate in the Scanian campaign because Frederik IV thought “the purchased regimental cloth was in the wrong shade”.

2nd Danish Regiment
(disbanded 1721)

J. D. Haxhausen
K. G. Osten
W. A. Schack
H. J. Arnold
W. A. Ingenhaef
H. J. Schack
C. A. av Sønderborg

1703
1704
1709
1710
1716
1717
1717

1703-1712 Light grey coat with blue lining and facings.
?-1721 Red coat. Red leg clothing and vest from 1716.

The regiment was created in 1703 by merging one battalion each from Prince Christian's and Prince Carl's regiments as well as a third of a battalion from the Marine Regiment.

The cuffs in the image to the right follow Daniel Schorr's description of the regulations from 1711 and 1716. But all the so called "Danish regiments" seem to have had the same type of cuffs. This could mean that the cuffs should have two stripes just like what Karsten Skjold Pedersen has noted for 1st and 3rd Danish. Höglund supports Schorr while the plate from 1716 only has one stripe but with reversed colours (if I interpreted it correctly).

3rd Danish Regiment

H. F. Boyneburg
K. G. Malzahn
A. A. Gaffron
M. Kragh

1703
1703
1705
1708

1703-1713 Light grey coat which 1703-1704 had yellow lining and facings.
1713-1765 Red coat.
1716-1735 Red vest and leg clothing.
1728-1735 Dark green lining, dark green facings with two white stripes and dark green collar with a white stripe as well as dark green buttonholes.

The regiment was created in 1703 by merging one battalion each from Sjællandske and Jyske regiments as well as a third of a battalion from the Marine Regiment.

According to Snorrason the regiment had yellow lining also in 1709 when it returned to Denmark from Austrian service.

I have, just like the in the case of the two preceding regiments, chosen to follow Daniel Schorr's description of the m/1711 and m/1716 cuffs and not Karsten Skjold Petersen. Höglund and the plate from 1716 support Schorr.

4th Danish Regiment
(disbanded 1721)

W. Enden
D. Reusch
J. Friis
O. K. Callenberg
A. von der Lühnen
P. Boye-Johansen

1703-1706
1706-1711
1711-1713
1713-1716
1716
1716

1703-1712 Light grey coat with red lining and facings.
1712-? The grey coat was replaced with a red coat at an unknown time.
1716-1721 Red coat, vest and leg clothing.

The regiment was created in 1703 by merging von Enden's and von Malzahn's battalions.

I  have, just like the in the case of the three preceding regiments, chosen to follow Daniel Schorr's description of the m/1711 and m/1716 cuffs. Höglund agrees with Schorr, but I find it difficult to identify this regiment in the plate from 1716 (does it have the colours reversed on the cuffs?).

von Enden's battalion

The battalion was recruited  in Oldenburg 1703 (1702?) as a part of the contingent sent to Austria. In Tyrol it was reinforced with K. G. von Malzahn's battalion and the unit was thereafter called the 4th infantry regiment. The enlistment patent from October 1701 called for blue coats with white facings, but when the regiment returned from Austrian service in 1709 it had grey coats with red facings

von Malzahn's battalion

The battalion was purchased from Mecklenburg 23 April 1703 and then hired to Austria which used it against Hungarian rebels. It was attacked on the night to 27 May 1704 and completely shattered. The remainder was incorporated with the 4th regiment. (according to Snorrason, Lars-Eric Höglund states that Malzahn's battalion was incorporated with the 3rd Danish Regiment). The uniform consisted in 1701 of a light grey coat with blue lining and facings, cloak the same, as well as leather breaches and blue stockings.

Callenberg's battalion

Recruited in Westphalia 1711 and incorporated with the 4th Danish regiment 25 April 1713.

Klepping's battalion

A battalion which was used to reinforce other existing regiments. It was purchased fully equipped from the duke of Sachsen-Meiningen in 1712 and the remainder was incorporated with the 4th Infantry Regiment 25 April 1713. According to a letter from 28 February 1712 the uniform consisted of a white coat and camisole with red lining and facings. Red breeches and stockings.

Württemberg-Oels' regiment
(disbanded 1714)

J. P. Bonar
Christian Ulrik of Württemberg-Oels

1702
1709

1701-? Light grey coat with blue lining and facings.

Snorrason writes that from 29 November 1701 the two Würtemberg-Oels regiments could have been dressed in light grey and yellow. This according to Vrigny's eye witness account which contradicts the instructions in the enlistment patents for the Würtemberg-Oels regiments.

According to Höglund the regiment had in 1712 a red coat with blue collar, cuffs and lining. Höglund is however the only one to mention this because the regiment was hired to the Maritime powers and thus not included in the regulation from 1711, and not in the regulation from 1716 either because the regiment was disbanded 1714. When the regiment was disbanded its soldiers were transferred to Oldenborgske Regiment. Just like Schorr, but in opposition to Skjold Petersen, Höglund claims that all Danish regiments after 1711 were issued red vests, breeches and stockings.

Hansen's regiment
(disbanded 1713)

1710-1712 Light grey coat with red lining, facings and leg clothing.
1712-1713 Red coat with green lining and white facings as well as red leg clothing.

Snorrason adds that the regiment in 1710 had a Grey-white camisole (vest) and a blue stripe on the cuffs.

Lars-Eric Höglund deviates from Karsten Skjold Petersen regarding the later uniform. According to Höglund Hansen's regiment had 1711 a red coat with white collar and steel grey lining.

This regiment was recruited in Germany and Holland and it only existed  1710-1713. One battalion was transferred to Prince Christian's regiment 1712 and the other was disbanded 1713.

Baartig's regiment
(disbanded 1713)

1710-1712 Light grey coat with red lining, red facings with a blue stripe as well as red leg clothing.
1712-1713 Red coat with orange lining and facings.

Snorrason adds that the regiment in 1710 had a Grey-white camisole (vest).

The regiment was raised 1710 but never reached more than a battalion's strength before it was disbanded and had its men transferred to 1st Danish Regiment 1713.

According to Höglund another regiment was raised by Baartig 1717. This time from Swedish prisoners of war who were then sold to the Republic of Venice (however the soldiers mutinied on their way to Venice and returned to Sweden via Holland). The uniform Höglund describes for this regiment appears to be the same to the one which according to Skjold Petersen was worn 1712-1713.

East Sjællandske National Regiment

D. Reusch
K. G. Malzahn
R. R. Biegen
A. Kaphengst
J. Barner

1701
1706
1708
1710
1711

1701-1714 Light grey coat with yellow buttons as well as lining and facings i dark red/wine red.
1714-1730 Red coat with yellow buttons and light blue lining.
1714-1716 Striped facings (red-white-light blue) as well as light blue vest and leg clothing.
1716-1730 Red vest and leg clothing.
1728 Light blue cuffs and collar. On the cuffs two light red stripes each surrounded by two white stripes. On the collar only one set of these three stripes.
1730 Light blue cuffs and collar. On the the cuffs two red, two white and one light blue stripe. On the collar one white stripe. White buttonholes.

West Sjællandske National Regiment
("South Sjællandske" from 1717)

F. Eppinger
M. Due
J. H. Bippen
E. Juel

1701
1706
1708
1717

1701-1714 Light grey coat with yellow buttons. Lining and facings in aurora 1701 and blue 1712. Pie coat had blue facings 1701.
1712-1716 Aurora lining and striped facings in aurora, red and white.
1714-1730 Red coat with yellow buttons.
1716-? Facings and lining in feuille morte.
1716-1722/1725 Lining in aurora. The two battalions then change to paille.
1716-1730 Red vest and leg clothing.
1722 Paille facings.
1728 Cuffs and collar in paille with two dark green stripes and a light red stripe in the middle of the cuffs as well as a dark green and light green stripe on the collar. White buttonholes

Fynske National Regiment

K. F. Bielke
D. Holstein
H. Schoulten
H. Weinemann

1701
1706
1714
1715

1701-1714 Light grey coat with yellow buttons. Facings and lining were 1701 Zinober red.
1712-1717 Green lining and leg clothing.
1714-1728 Red coat with yellow buttons. Cuffs and collar green with multi-coloured ribbon (red-white-green 1717).
1717-1730 Red vest and leg clothing.
1728-1730 Red coat with yellow buttons. Cuffs and collar dark green with two white stripes on the cuffs and one on the collar.

Vrigny wrote in 1702 that the regiment also had hats edged with red and with a red cockade. The stockings had red stripes on the sides and back. They also only carried one colour per battalion.

Ålborgske
National
Regiment

H. Rosenauer

1701-1723

1701-1714 Light grey coat with yellow buttons. Facings and lining were brown 1701, feuille morte 1708 (likewise leg clothing) and "fire yellow" to 1711.
1712-1716 Yellow lining and 1712 facings i red-blue-yellow (1713-1717 cuffs and collar yellow with multi-coloured ribbons).
1714-1730 Red coat with yellow buttons which 1730 had light brown lining. Some companies were issued grey coats 1718.
1716-1730 Red vest and leg clothing. Some companies were issued leather breaches 1718.
1717-? Facings in red-blue-yellow.
?-1730 Light brown lining

I suspect that the facing colours for the period 1701-1711 (brown, feuille morte and "fire yellow") are different names for the same shade. The plate from 1716 shows the blue colour on the facings as light blue.

Århusiske National Regiment

K. Bartholin
K. Möstling

1701
1704-1720

1701-1714 Light grey coat with yellow buttons. Dark blue facings and lining 1701. Facings in red-black-blue and blue lining 1712.
1714-1730 Red coat with yellow buttons 1714-16 and white buttons 1728-30. Blue lining 1712-1717 and light blue lining 1730. Cuffs and collar blue with multi-coloured ribbons 1714-17 (red-black-blue 1717-?). 1728-1730 light blue facings with two white stripes and light blue collar with one white stripe.
1716-1730 Red vest and leg clothing.

The plate from 1716 (image below to the right) shows facings with a light blue shade.
 


Musketeer of Århusiske National Regiment 1728. The national militia were not issued vests and therefore had their coat buttoned. The infantry still use gauntlets of yellow leather. The drawing clearly shows the belts. Worgewitz 1728. Tøjhusmuseet.

Plate with cuffs for the entire army 1716. As something new, stripes are introduced on the cuffs. Rigsarkivet, Landetatens arkiv, Krigskancelliet. (Click here to see the the image in a larger scalea)

Riberske National Regiment

P. Ingenhaven
H. J. Arnold
J. Friis
D. Rausch
P. Hegemann
G. Lottig

1701
1710
1710
1711
1711
1717

1701-1714 Light grey coat with yellow buttons. Light green lining and facings 1701. Yellow lining, facings and leg clothing 1712-1714.
1714-1730 Red coat with yellow buttons. Some companies were issued grey coats 1718.
1714-1717 yellow lining and leg clothing. Cuffs and collar black with multi-coloured ribbons.
1716-1730 Red vest and from 1717 red leg clothing (some companies were issued leather breaches 1718).
1717-? Red lining and red facings with one à two blue stripes.
1728-1730 Cuffs, collar and lining "blommefarvet" (bleumerant or flower coloured?) with two light blue stripes on the cuffs and one on the collar. Red buttonholes.

According to Schorr the facings from 1717 were supposed to have looked like the small image to the right. A plate from 1716 show however a different order on the colours (as well as showing a light blue shade). I have interpreted Skjold Petersen and Höglund as describing the order of the plate and not Schorr's.

Viborg and Lolland's
National
Regiment
(disbanded 1717)

A. Peperlow
E. Juel

1701
1705

1701-1714 Light grey coat with yellow buttons. Yellow lining and facings.
1714-1717 Red coat with yellow buttons and paille-yellow lining. The facings were possibly paille-yellow 1714-1716. The facings were 1717 in the colours red-paille-green.
1716-1717 Red vest and leg clothing.

 

Oldenborgske National Regiment

K. Bcoatdorff
H. J. Samsø

1704
1710-1737

1704-1714 Light grey coat with yellow buttons and lining in feuille morte. Probably vest and leg clothing also in feuille morte until 1716. The facings were in feuille morte 1704.
1714-1730 Red coat with yellow buttons and lining in feuille morte.
1714-1716 Facings in feuille morte with white and blue stripes.
1716-1730 Cuffs and collar in feuille morte with 2x3 stripes i white-light blue-white on the cuffs and 1x3 on the collar. Red vest and leg clothing.

Höglund deviates by stating red-yellow instead of feuille morte for the light grey uniform and brown-yellow for the red. Feuille morte is French for "autumn leaves" or literally: "dead leaves".

Schorr deviates both from Skjold Petersen and Höglund by having the facings in four colours 1714 (red-blue-white-feuille morte). The plate showing the army's cuffs from 1716 seems to support Schorr. The plate also shows the blue colour as a light blue shade.

Bornholm Militia

1700-1716 Unknown uniform
1716-1777 Red leg clothing and vest (infantry)

The Bornholm militia was a special garrison unit which 1699 consisted of three infantry companies, one cavalry company and an artillery company. All in all with a combined strength of 613 men. Unfortunately neither Torstein Snorrason or Lars-Eric Höglund have any information about their uniforms

Free Companies

On several places in Denmark there were Free Companies garrisoning redoubts. At the outbreak of the war there were two with 50 men each at Fladstrand and Hitler skans, and a 83 men strong company at Christiansö outside Bornholm. In 1706 a fourth company was created inKorsör. Torstein Snorrason states that the two former should have had light grey coats with dark red lining according to the regulation of 1699.

Drabantgarden
(Drabant Guard)

Finally there was also the prestigious Drabantgarden with 57 men (including officers) which served as the King's body guard. They also served as officers at the Foot Guards (Livgarden til Fods) and other line regiments. According to Snorrason the drabants were almost eliminated at the battle of Helsingborg and according to Höglund most of the corps was killed at Gadebusch. Karsten Skjold Petersen does not mentions the unit but Höglund and Snorrason states that the uniform consisted of a crimson coat with blue facings. On a picture from Christian V's time they are also seen wearing a red cassock decorated with "C5" in gold.

Read also about Danish cavalry uniforms.